How Waiakea Water is About to Become Even More Earth-Friendly

Waiakea Hawaiian Volcanic Water will soon be selling its bottled water brand in bottles that will break down in years instead of centuries. The bottles, which are also 100% recyclable, will be made using TimePlast which is an additive that will be introduced into the plastic making up the bottle. The addition of TimePlast means that bottles containing it will completely break down in 15 years. Regular water bottles take about 1,500 years as a comparison on how quickly this happens.

Ryan Emmons, who is the chief executive officer of Waiakea as well as its founder, said that the problem in the industry is that too many water bottles end up in landfills. He also said that advances in the technology behind water bottles has been focused for years on making the bottles stronger and better. This new approach, he says, is focused on making them weaker so that they’re far more environmentally friendly as well as simpler on a molecular level.

The new Waiakea bottles will be introduced to the public in 2018. Sustainability and environmental responsibility are some of the key values of this Hawaiian company. The new bottles took about five years to develop. The addition of TimePlast won’t increase the cost of Waiakea bottled water because its costs is negligible. Emmons said it’s about the same price as the colorant that is added to Waiakea water bottles during the manufacturing process.

Waiakea is also a socially responsible company. They donate clean water in citizens in Africa for each bottle of Waiakea they sell. This company formed a partnership with Pump Aid which puts inexpensive and low maintenance water pumps into villages in Africa. Many African communities lack a source of clean water which the partnership between Waiakea and Pump Aid is meant to help solve.

Waiakea Volcanic Water can now be found in stores across the United States as well as online such as at Amazon. It was rated the #1 volcanic bottle water brand of 2017 by the organization 10 Best Water. They cited its taste as well as its healthiness due to the presence of natural minerals.

Louis Chenevert’s Leadership Improved the Performance of UTC

In the postwar era, America’s manufacturing sector has remained in the woods, with a GDP barely half of the 25 percent that it registered in the 1950s. The once superior manufacturing brands like RCA, Baldwin Locomotives, Bethlehem Steel and Philco have all withered. However, a few manufacturing enterprises in the US have not only managed to survive, but also thrive in this postwar era. United Technologies Corporation (UTC) is a good example. UTC has beaten the odds of foreign competition, diverse popular culture and heavy regulation to emerge as an industry leader. UTC has stayed on top of the game in aerospace technologies without changing its original offices or compromising public matters such as environmental compliance. Louis Chenevert was the force behind the $100 billion conglomerate that has maintained a steady financial performance.

Until December 2014, Louis Chenevert led UTC as the chairman and CEO. After working for General Motors for over a decade, the visionary leader joined UTC’s unit, Pratt & Whitney. After six years of outstanding performance, Louis was promoted to serve as the president of Pratt & Whitney in 1999. His professionalism and unique leadership style earned him even higher positions. The board of the company named him as the president and CEO of United Technologies Corporation. His tenure at UTC is highlighted by impressive records like overseeing the acquisition of Goodrich by leading the negotiations. At the company, Louis focused on investing in the advancement of technology and growth of individuals.

His strategy of investing in the people is captured by the unique Employee Scholar Program. Chenevert invested in it for purposes of enabling workers to access scholarships and advance their studies. He is also credited for securing a contract on behalf of Pratt & Whitney to supply F-35 engines to the US Air Force. Under Louis’s visionary leadership, the company’s unit, Sikorsky, grew to become the leading manufacturer of helicopters in the US. The celebrated leader continued with his strategy of investing in advanced technologies. In a period of over 20 years, Louis committed $10 million in the development of the GTF engine by Pratt & Whitney. The executive delivered exceptional results in everything that he touched. Even after his departure, the company continues to benefit from his business strategies.